Jeremy's design work, hand-typography and illustrations can be found on apparel for action sports companies like Burton Snowboards and Jetty Clothing or on boards for popular SUP companies like Yolo Board. Over the years, his work has been featured in books like the Graphis New Talent Design Annual, Custom Kicks, and HOW magazine, as well as on websites like Adobe Partners by Design, CSSRemix, Design:Related, Design You Trust, NotCot, Webdesignerwall.com, and many more. In 2010, Jeremy was commissioned by Vans Shoes to create 10 unique one-of-a-kind custom-painted shoes for display in their flagship stores throughout the world in places like San Francisco's Union Square and Beijing as part of their Custom Culture campaign.

Jeremy has been a regular speaker on his work and all-things-design since 2007. He was one of four speakers at AIGA Orlando's Re:Solutions Conference January '09 with headliner Debbie Millman. Jeremy has also spoken at a number of colleges over the years including Flagler College, Full Sail University, University of Central Florida and Rollins College.

Jeremy lives in sunny Orlando, FL with his wife, Jen and 3 sons, Kingston, Zeke, and Harbor. When they're not pushing pixels and draining ink pens, they can be found adventuring around Central Florida's beaches and lakes.

HOW DO YOU SAY KENEDIK?

It's pronounced like kinetic.

I grew up with an interest in space and science and wanted to integrate my name KENNEDY into the brand somehow. Thus came up with KENEDIK (an alternate spelling of kinetic) in 2003. The idea is that we're always learning, always growing, always trying to create and be inspired.

WHAT ARE YOUR DESIGN RATES?

Each of our client's projects have unique and different needs. The best way to start is with our contact page and check off the type of project you're looking to do and we can get the conversation started.

You can also contact us at newbiz@kenedik.com. We look forward to working with you.

What Social networks are you on?

Twitter at twitter.com/kenedik and twitter.com/cameraluv
Pinterest at pinterest.com/cameraluv

SHOULD I ATTEND ART COLLEGE?

You don't have to go to an art school to be successful, but you do need to have a drive to learn your craft. Devour everything you can design-wise, read books, go to lectures, take pictures, draw in sketchbooks. You should also surround yourself with good people who can push you to be better in all areas of your life.

I attended Ringling College of Art and Design in the early 2000s and thought it was a really good experience overall.

I'M WORKING ON A REPORT FOR SCHOOL. CAN YOU ANSWER SOME QUESTIONS FOR ME?

We'd be happy to help, schedule permitting. Keep it short and sweet. Say hello at info@kenedik.com or on our contact page.

ANY ADVICE FOR YOUNG DESIGNERS STARTING OUT?

Do what you love. Find that stuff that really fires you up and go for it. You'll be more happy and you'll probably make better work. 

You also may not want to go into business for yourself right off the bat. First get some experience working for someone who inspires you and stretches you to learn. Learn how offices should or shouldn't be run, learn how to collaborate with various departments and personality types (but be sure to always be working on your own stuff on the side the whole time) When the time is right, start your own shop.

I'VE GOT A PROJECT THAT FITS YOUR STYLE PERFECTLY, IT DOESN'T PAY, BUT YOU'LL GET A LOT OF GREAT EXPOSURE. WHEN CAN WE START?

Sorry, that's not going to happen. We've got really cute kids to feed and your exposure will not satisfy their voracious appetites.

WILL YOU COME AND SPEAK AT MY SCHOOL OR DESIGN EVENT?

Jeremy enjoys meeting students, talking shop and traveling, so give us some details and we'll check his schedule.

Send your inquiries to speakout@kenedik.com.

I'D LOVE TO VISIT YOUR STUDIO. CAN I STOP BY?

Sorry, we're not offering tours at this time.

ARE YOU HIRING?

Unfortunately, we're not hiring at this time. We'd like to clone ourselves sometimes. Let us know if you have access to a device capable of such things.

I WANT SOME EXPERIENCE. DO YOU OFFER INTERSHIPS?

We do not currently have any intern positions available at this time.

WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR IDEAS?

They come from all around. You don’t know what will strike you and each project has it’s own needs. It’s the old signage on the street, it’s the sunset, it’s the way the tide has pushed in the driftwood, the line of that new Audi car ... you just never know. 

I like to collect cameras, but also collect all kinds of cool print ephemera or vintage skateboards… I’ve got a bunch of flat files in the studio full of random cards, tags, letterpress stuff and posters. 

I guess I'll have to admit we also have a little bit of an obsession with Pinterest as well. I’ve pretty much run out of room for my cameras, so I’m filling up pinboards instead. I think it kind of satiates my appetite for collecting random stuff, without the clutter. You can waste a bunch of time here: (pinterest.com/cameraluv). 

IS THERE SYMBOLIC IMAGERY IN YOUR WORK? 

Not really, but hopefully I leave a little stamp of myself into everything I do. I used to design magazines and books a lot, and would hide stuff in the gutters or illustrations all the time. I always try to find a connection to the work I’m doing so that I can learn something and grow from it no matter what it is. It’s always cool to take something that was just an idea, a few words or just a word doc from a client and turn it into something visual and something people want to keep.

WHAT MEDIUMS DO YOU USE AND HOW DID YOU DECIDE ON THIS?

I pretty much use all the mediums at different times. I’m on the computer probably more than I used to be, but I’ll use pencil, pen and ink, and a little paint and the most recent batch of tees for one of my clients some of my photography was mixed in. If I’m drawing a camera or something I’ll compose one of mine, and photograph it or just draw it, then scan stuff back in and work in Illustrator or Photoshop to get it ready for print.

WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO ACCOMPLISH AS AN ARTIST?

I’ve always been really goal driven, but my priorities have shifted more to family as I have a few young boys and a beautiful wife. I don’t really aspire to have a one-man gallery show or be known by everybody. I just want to create and collaborate on things people love to wear or hold or read or experience, and all the while have fun and support my family.

CameraLuv began as side project for Jeremy to showcase his camera-infused art, but it’s evolved into a blog offering photography-related inspiration and resources to photographers and camera lovers worldwide. Some of the most popular sections on CameraLuv are Photographers We Luv and Jeremy’s ever-growing wish list of fun and interesting Must-Have Cameras he want’s to get his hands on.

In his teens, Jeremy’s love for photography grew by documenting friends skateboarding, wakeboarding, surfing, snowboarding and riding motorcycles. It led him to develop his own photos, make posters, film movies and eventually minor in photography in college.

During a break from college, his vintage collection started in a flash with the discovery of his dad’s childhood camera, a greenish Sabre 620 (1) (circa 1954) in the basement of his grandmother’s house. Later that day he found his Uncle’s old Imperial Mark XII (2) (1961-65) in the basement closet, and in an upstairs drawer, the 1948 Kodak 35 (3). Already owning a few Nikons, he was hooked on these interesting vintage cameras, realizing they not only exist as a beautifully designed objects, they serve to capture the memories we make. By the end of the visit, he had searched through the house gathered eight cameras including the SabreImperialKodak 35, a Brownie Hawkeye (4), three Kodak Instamatics (5,6,7) and his great grandmother’s Wirgin (8) camera from around 1920. The modest starter collection of eight has since grown into hundreds of both still and motion cameras and has become a full-blown obsession of all things camera.

Follow @cameraluv on twitter for updates and inspirations on all-things-camera and photography.